The ultimate reading list for newbie travelers Comments Off on The ultimate reading list for newbie travelers 2277

Before you go traveling for the first time, you’re going to get a lot of crap advice from people who don’t know what they are talking about.

They mean well, of course, but they have never been traveling themselves so they aren’t imparting wisdom – just vague warnings based on what they have heard. These are the people who will tell you that it is more dangerous than it is, or that you are damaging your future career prospects, or that travel is unaffordable and unsustainable, or that you should stay only in five-star resorts and wear your backpack on your front.

However, when you start reading and listening to the messages from people who have actual travel experience, you’ll hear a different story. You’ll learn that the world is not as dangerous and scary as people think, that travel can be much more affordable than you know and that it’s possible to have truly amazing experiences if you are willing to go outside your comfort zone.

So, before you travel I highly recommend reading and listening to the messages from people who have actually been on the road and know travel first hand. They will be able to give you realistic advice so that you begin your first journey with the right expectations.

Fortunately, there are a TON of great travel resources available out there, developed by actual travelers who have real-world experience navigating the globe. These are the blogs, books, podcasts, etc. that I would recommend you read and listen to if you are preparing to go traveling for the first time.

Blogs

Legal Nomads

Jodi is one of my favorite travel writers on the internet. She shares the perfect balance of personal narrative and practical advice. Even though she publishes huge, long, in-depth posts, they are so well written that you can read through a 10,000-word post without even noticing.

Every newbie traveler should read her incredibly comprehensive page of Travel Resources where she shares a ton of helpful information and advice. Then, visit this page to find more links to her other tips and information on traveling the world. Also, take the time to read some of her beautiful personal travel essays, such as Silence and Spiders: 10 Days at a Vipassana Meditation Course.

Nomadic Matt

Matt is one of the biggest travel bloggers out there – and for good reason. He offers really solid, valuable, useful travel tips that are helpful for any newbie traveler. For example, here are 61 Travel Tips to Make You the World’s Savviest Traveler, 12 Things I’d Tell a New Traveler and 14 Major Travel Scams to Avoid.

(That last one is particularly important to read. You’ll have a much safer journey if you know what scams to watch out for.)

Expert Vagabond

Matt Karsten is a travel photographer and professional blogger with a ton of experience – he’s been traveling the world for 7 years. His site is filled with an incredible amount of useful information for a newbie traveler and he explains in-depth how travel doesn’t have to be expensive and the world isn’t as dangerous as you think. Plus, his photos are gorgeous.

You can get a lot of entertainment and vicarious thrills by reading Matt’s crazy travel adventure stories, such as squatting with gypsies in caves in Spain or getting tattooed by a monk in Thailand. However, he also offers a lot of valuable travel tips and advice, such as a huge regularly updated page of budget travel resources and advice that will help you with finding cheap flights, planning, saving money, safety, and much more.

Wandering Earl

Earl is another blogger I love who has serious travel experience – he’s been to 101 countries so far and has been traveling since 1999. His blog is packed with great info, so spend some time exploring it. One of my favorite posts of his is The Currency of Pad Thai, which explains eloquently just how affordable travel can actually be.

TravelFish

If you are going anywhere in Southeast Asia, I highly recommend you bookmark Travelfish. It’s an independent travel guide covering Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Myanmar.

No matter what tiny island or small town you find yourself in, Travelfish probably has a guide to the hotels, weather information, things to do, transport, and more. Plus, they have a travel forum where you can ask questions when planning your trip.

Roads & Kingdoms

Okay, so now you’ve read plenty of practical advice from wise, experienced travelers. It’s time to read some intriguing stories from the road that will inspire you for your trip. Roads & Kingdoms is a fascinating collection of travelogues from odd and interesting corners of the world. It often features off the beaten travel locales, food adventures, and insights into different cultures and makes for a great read.

Books

Vagabonding by Rolf Potts

You know that feeling when you read a book and it completely changes your way of seeing the world and the way you live your life? Well, that’s what Vagabonding did for me.

I read it while I was backpacking around New Zealand in 2009 and it taught me that I didn’t have to live a conventional life and that travel didn’t have to be something that you did once when you were young. I learned it was completely possible to travel the world for long periods of time in a sustainable way.

So, that’s exactly what I did and I’ve been to 50 countries since, traveling the world as a digital nomad and working from my laptop. Seriously, this book is inspiring and if you have the travel bug it just may change your life too.

Back in 6 Years: A Journey Around the Planet Without Leaving the Surface

I read this book before I went traveling for the first time and it certainly was one of the factors that inspired me to go. It’s the true story of a man who travels around the world for six years, circumnavigating the globe without leaving its surface.

He gets across the Amazon by boat, across Canada by bike, and sails across the South Atlantic. It’s funny and gripping and of course, he gets into a lot of mishaps along the way. This book left me breathless with excitement and wanting to circumnavigate the globe too.

The Four Hour Workweek

This is another one of the books that I read in my early travel days which helped to change my mindset. Now, full warning here: Tim Ferriss is a bit of an extreme dude and some people find him a bit off-putting.  A reviewer described this book as being locked “in a room with a manic-depressive person during the manic part of his cycle” and I can understand that. He’s obsessed with trying to hack and optimise every aspect of his life and that leads him into overzealous, crazy experiments with diet, sleep, etc. – most of which isn’t helpful for the average person.

However, if you can get past the manic ramblings and disregard the stuff that doesn’t work for you, there is some golden wisdom in here for newbie travelers. Basically, Tim is a bit of an egomaniac but the important thing I got out of it is that you don’t have to experience the world the way you were told you should.

Tim explains that you don’t have to be rich to travel often and he encourages taking “mini-retirements” throughout your life rather than planning to retire when you are older. He encourages you to rethink the status quo and imagine your life as you would really like to live it, which can be very inspiring. You don’t have to work nonstop for 45 years then retire – there are other options for satisfying your travel urges.

Podcasts

Extra Pack of Peanuts

This podcast is run by Travis and Heather and they offer a lot of helpful travel tips, including how to use airline points, what travel gear to bring, how to use your phone while traveling, and more. As well as the podcast, their website also has a ton of helpful resources.

Zero to Travel Podcast

This is another helpful and practical podcast that offers tips for traveling on a budget, dealing with life on the road and other questions that newbie travelers may have. It promises to offer “new and different ways to travel the world no matter what your situation or experience.”

These are just a few of the blogs, books, and podcasts that I would recommend you start reading and listening to if you are planning to travel for the first time. There’s so much wisdom out there being shared by those who have made the journey themselves.

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Getting your kids to read this summer Comments Off on Getting your kids to read this summer 64586

Summer means different things for different people. For twenty-year-old’s, it’s the time to work and party; for parents, it’s the time to hold neighborhood events and start saving up, and for kids, it’s the time to kick back and finally have some fun. School’s out! 😃 It’s that one time of the year when they can go to the beach and hang out with all their friends without worrying about some project or homework. For them, the entire summer is all about having fun, and as a parent, it’s your sacred duty to balance fun with continuing education. You might even be able to replace “fun” with something more rewarding – like reading!

Knowledge attained outside the classroom tends to stick around longer

You don’t want to be the “uncool” parent that forces your kid to do something school-related during the summer, but you don’t really have that much of choice, here’s why. The lessons that really stick with you long after you finish school are the ones that you learned when you didn’t really have to.

The knowledge that is acquired without some form of ultimatum or consequence always leaves a lasting impression. It also introduces you to a new side of knowledge that is not purely scholarly.

Reading is right for you regardless of what it is that you decide to read – obviously you will have to control your kids’ intake in your spare time. Reading strengthens the mind, and continual learning increases the speed at which you assimilate and process information. Just imagine the kind of impact a fantastic reading speed could have on your kid educational future. You could be adequately preparing them for a future in academia.

Exposure

The reward of “ruining” their obsessively fun summer will be some exposure to other subjects and topics that are unfamiliar to them. Recreational reading could be very instrumental in building up their overall personality. Plus, proper exposure ensures that they have enough information to make smarter and more informed decisions at a tender age.

It can teach them to research and ask questions

Summer reading could form the basis of a voracious reading habit that could beautifully complement their curiosity. It’s not every kid that thinks about something strange that eventually go on to investigate, summer reading could introduce them to the concept of research.

How to get your kids to read during the summer

It’s easy to talk about getting your kids to read during the summer, getting them to do it another issue entirely.

Kids can be especially stubborn or pigheaded when you are trying to force them to do what they simply have no interest in. The only way to have them do what you want the right way is to either introduce a reward system or trick them that it’s all their idea. Local library’s often offer summer reading lists per age group.

Reward system

Are you having a hard time getting your kid to do anything you want? Wait patiently, there is always something they’ll want, and you can use that to get what you want – in this case, it’s a healthy reading habit.

When they come to you with a ridiculous demand, you can propose a fair trade that will engage their mind and keep it focused on a book that you’ll recommend. You can even choose to deliver the reward after the completion of several books, that way, you are getting the most out of your deal.

You can also choose to limit or restrict play time, and the completion of a certain number of pages could be the requirement they must fulfill before they are allowed to play again.

Making them think it’s their idea

In my experience, people are always more motivated to complete a project that they believe to be totally theirs. When it’s your plan, you just tend to pay more attention to it, it’s like you want to prove something to yourself and others around you. Adults think this way, and so do kids. They can be pretty devoted to completing a book they just accidentally stumbled upon or saw you flip through.

Sometimes you don’t have to be so obvious or aggressive, you could give a rousing speech about reading and hand them a book that you know that they’ll enjoy and leave the rest to them.

The summertime doesn’t have to all about vacations and parties, it could also be an opportunity for your kid to develop a reasonably analytical mind.

Is your partner complaining about your snoring? You might have a problem. Comments Off on Is your partner complaining about your snoring? You might have a problem. 55018

Your partner might not have the heart to tell you, but your snoring sucks. They might tell you that it’s slight and cute and they don’t mind, but they are just trying not to hurt your feelings. I, on the other hand, have no such obligation. In truth, snoring isn’t as annoying and unbearable as I make it out to be. It might actually be “cute” but something has to be done about it nonetheless. It might be a sign of something more serious than just a mildly distasteful sleeping habit. So, is your snoring far more serious than you think, or am I just being hard?

Having sleep apnea isn’t necessarily a bad thing (ok technically it is). But it doesn’t always have to be life or death. You could see a doctor and try to get things sorted out before it’s too late. After all, sleep apnea deprives your entire body and brain of some much-needed oxygen.

An individual is said to have sleep apnea when they don’t get enough oxygen during sleep because their brain isn’t sending signals fast enough to the rest of the body. It doesn’t know to breathe in during sleep; or it could be caused when the muscles of the throat are relaxed which causes the pathways to narrow, so the body doesn’t get enough oxygen during sleep. There are three major types of apnea and although their causes vary, they pretty much cause similar problems down the road.

I’m not typing this long list of diseases to scare you, but they are some of the possible conditions that might result from prolonged sleep apnea.

Some of the diseases that can arise from sleep apnea are:

  • High blood pressure
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Liver problems
  • Sleep-deprived partners

Although the diseases on this list are scary and often life-threatening, they rarely happen in most cases. Like with most life-threatening diseases out there, early identification is what it’s all about.

Here are a few ways of identifying sleep apnea:

  • Loud snoring
  • Short moments when you stop breathing completely
  • Dry mouth in the morning
  • Falling asleep during the day
  • Insomnia
  • Irritability
  • Short attention span while awake

Note: Sleep apnea isn’t quite identical across the spectrum. Some people don’t even snore loudly at night. I know that this might sound confusing but things aren’t always as simple as they seem. You have to watch out for some of the other symptoms if you think that you might have sleep apnea. Your best bet is to just get yourself checked out whenever you can.

Now then, how exactly can we help ourselves when we find out that we have sleep apnea?

Although there are some home remedies and radical dietary alternatives, the safest solution is going with modern medicine. In-person sleep studies, surgeries, and even medications are all options that might be available to you. With that said, here are a few things easy ways to help with your sleep apnea.

Keep your weight under check

Although this symptom is particularly restricted to obstructive sleep apnea, it’s a great idea to adopt it nonetheless. It’ll look after you long after the sleep apnea has passed and it does come with some added physical advantages. It is well known that obesity has a lot of unsightly consequences, but what most people don’t know is that it can also be the cause of sleep apnea. Obesity blocks some of the essential pathways such as the nasal passages and this often results in sleep apnea.

Change your sleep position

It has been noted that certain sleeping postures actually help with your sleep apnea. Something as simple as sleeping on your side can greatly impact the overall frequency of your snores and gasps. Sleeping on your side makes it less likely for your tongue to obstruct your airway. Although not everyone is immediately relieved by this simple home remedy, it’s still quite memorable all things considered.

Quit smoking

In case you might not know, smoking can kill you eventually. They don’t only break down the cells in your lungs, they also increase inflammation and fluid retention in the throat which can cause sleep apnea.

Sleep regularly

I understand that gasping for breath in the middle of the night can be problematic but adequate sleep goes a long way in improving the quality of your sleep and your life span altogether.

Your partner’s sporadic sleep pattern might not be a result of his or her strange sleeping habits. It might be something more serious than that and you should always watch him or her when they are asleep. That is when you will really know if they are at risk.

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