Be Healthy Without Cutting Everything Out of Your Diet: 10 Traveler’s Tips to Being Healthy 0 957

Lately, diet trends have been to cut out entire food groups deeming some too unhealthy to incorporate into your diet at all. You only need to travel to prove that eliminating food groups from your diet is unnecessary. The proof is in hundreds and thousands of years of food habits and traditions that exist in countries around the world. Traveling is a great way to assess lifestyle and eating habits around the world and develop a Rolodex of eating habits that can be incorporated into your day-to-day life. While it might not be possible to adapt every great lifestyle habit, like taking a famous Spanish siesta after lunch, into your day-to-day life, there is a lot to learn about diet from other countries. Since developing this arsenal of alternative eating habits takes some time, I’ve compiled a list of some that I’ve picked up from years of traveling and living abroad that I incorporate into my daily diet.

1. Balance & portion control

Stop cutting foods out of your diet and start learning to balance your diet and eat the appropriate quantity of food. You don’t have to stop eating carbs, meat, or gluten to maintain a healthy diet or even lose weight. Maintaining balance and portion control are the keys to eating what you want and being healthy. Italians eat pasta every single day, at least once per day, and as a population, Italians are usually named one of the most healthy in the world. Carbs are not the problem, but taking into account the portion you are consuming and what else you’re eating during the day is important. Ensure that you are also eating meat or fish, fruits, and vegetables, not simply carbs.

2. Big lunch and small dinner

Turn lunch and dinner upside-down. In most of North America, the largest meal of the day is in the evening, and lunch tends to be quick and small. In many other countries, I’ve visited the largest meal of the day is in the afternoon – not at night. After eating a large lunch, there is time to work off the energy throughout the day and leaves you needing a much smaller meal for dinner. I became accustomed to eating like this a few years ago after working in Spain and I and felt more energetic and happy – not to mention I lost weight quickly. I’ve managed to maintain this style of eating for a few years now and the weight has stayed off too.

3. Salad at the end of the meal

In Italy, they eat salad at the end of the meal, not the beginning. Eat leafy greens with nothing more than olive oil and vinegar or lemon and a pinch of salt and pepper, to help aid digestion after the meal.

4. Olive oil

Speaking of Italians, they have been named the most healthy country in the world by the Bloomberg Global Health Index due in part to the population’s high intake of olive oil. Raw olive oil drizzled over vegetables, bread, arugula, fish, and beans are some great ways to consume more olive oil.

5. Fruit

Eat fruit every day. This one can be difficult if you live somewhere where the fruit is less than interesting or not of very high quality. Living in Colombia I discovered my roommates always had a collection of fresh fruits like papaya, guanábana, and passion fruit and each morning they made fresh juice in a simple blender and, well, with almost every meal. In Italy and France, eating whatever fruit is in season after lunch or dinner is custom. I’ve once heard it’s best to eat fruit for breakfast but really as long as it is incorporated into your diet, it works.

6. Switch to unsalted butter

The first time I lived in Europe, I discovered that it is typically difficult to find salted butter. It is not very common for people to use. In fact, I had a really difficult time finding it in Portugal and Germany. You don’t have to cut out butter, but switch to unsalted, I promise you won’t miss salted butter, it’s so easy to add salt to your food and it will reduce your salt intake exponentially.

7. Bulgur

Living in Turkey, I discovered what is commonly called Bulgur Rice. It is not rice at all but cracked wheat, and incredibly healthy for you. Usually, it is really cheap, and it is quick and simple to cook. It is high in fiber and protein, rich in minerals, and low in fat and delicious when cooked with spices.

8. Eat fish

If you’re lucky enough to live somewhere where there is good, inexpensive fish, eat fish at least once a week. Japan is the number one consumer of fish in the world and came out on top of the list of the World Health Organization (WHO) list of countries where people live to full health longest.

9. Eat cheese at the end of the meal

People have a preconceived notion that cheese is not good for you. I spent about three-and-a-half-years working in a cheese bar learning about its health benefits when quality cheese is consumed in moderation. Easier said than done, right? A trick I learned from living in France is to eat cheese at the end of the meal. This will ensure that you are full enough that you don’t eat the whole round of cheese in one sitting. In France and Italy, they eat cheese every day and are much healthier than North Americans on a whole.

10. Eat slow

Meals should be enjoyed and savored, never rushed. Eating slowly will allow your mind to catch up with your body in deciding if your full or not. Eating quickly leads to overeating. Just about every European culture makes time for each meal to be enjoyed. In Japan, it is typical to stop eating when they are starting to feel full and take a 10 minute break to determine if they are still hungry. So slow down, and enjoy your food, it’s not just healthy but great way to find relaxation in the day.

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Olivia Ragni is a wine professional from the United States who is studying Viticulture and Enology in Europe. She works as a freelance writer focusing on travel, food, wine, and culture. Her passion for wine and culture takes her around the world, rarely living in one country for more than an year. She hopes her stories will inspire others to embrace the unknown, drink smarter, and travel more often.

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Red Algae as a Skin Care Ingredient 0 225

Red Algae
Sanseti's 4-Step Skin Essentials Kit
Sanseti’s 4-Step Skin Essentials Kit

If you have been following me and by blogposts over the years you know how much I love skin care. And how much I have grown to love and review healthy skin care. Because what we put on our skin effects our health. Hormones, toxicity, skin disorders, and much more. I have found that I am enjoying a lot of amazing skin care with some great ingredients. And Red Algae is one. Below let me break it down to you the greatness of this oceanic plant.

Algae has been used in skin care for thousands of years. It’s been dubbed a “miracle ingredient” and the “ocean’s most potent secret,” and there are even entire skin care lines and brands dedicated to using algae and other marine extracts (you’ve heard about Sanseti, right?). Well I will be reviewing Sanseti. And unfortunately other brands like La Mer have so many chemicals along with its great ingredients that it really has no benefits to speak of. And this is my opinion on my use of this cream and my research on its ingredients. Like I said read your labels. Learn what it good and bad for your skin.

There are two primary types of algae: macro and micro. Macro is large-scale type that’s visible to the naked eye. It’s the stuff you see floating in the ocean and think of first when someone says the word “algae.” This includes seaweed, kelp, and laminaria (the brownish red seaweed that’s typically found in Japan). Microalgae, as you probably guessed, is super tiny. In fact, it’s a “single cell” algae, and you can’t see it without a microscope. This type is often found in freshwater and marine systems in both water and sediment.

Image result for red algae

Algae’s Skin Care Benefits

Micro and macro algae are both found in skin care products and boast numerous benefits. Most notable, perhaps, is its ability to instantly hydrate and condition the skin. Upon using products containing this ingredient, you’ll notice a more supple, moisturized complexion that’s soft to the touch.

Algae is also an antioxidant, meaning it protects your skin from free radicals that cause premature aging. In that sense, it’s an excellent ingredient for those who are worried about aging skin which is, well, most of us! Finally, it is high in essential amino acids, proteins, and a variety of vitamins—including vitamins A, B, C, and E. Talk about a loaded, super ingredient!

Skin types that benefit most from algae-infused products are dry skin, sensitive skin, and those who want to combat and prevent signs of aging.

Now let me name some amazing skin care lines that have this beautiful ingredient. And I do know that they all are amazing for you and your skin health.

Sanseti

Elemis

Algenist

Look for my review and blogpost on Sanseti soon!! I will pick my favorite product from the line next week and post about it on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook!!

~Tiffany♥

How to Pack Your Bathroom into Your Suitcase: Tips for Lightweight Traveling 0 6411

Suitcase Packing

Traveling with toiletries in carry-on luggage can be a bit tricky. Between the size restrictions on liquids and trying to stuff all of your liquids into a small zip-lock bag, things get frustrating. Below you can find some tips for packing your bathroom into a suitcase in order to help you travel lighter and smarter.

TSA 3-1-1 Rule
TSA 3-1-1 Rule

Tip 1: Don’t pack it if you are not certain that you need it.

Rethink everything you put in your suitcase, especially when it comes to toiletries. Many people try to put every product they have in their bathroom into their suitcase just in case they might need it. Remember, it’s easy to purchase toiletries just about anywhere you travel. A forgotten item is not the end of the world, simply head down to the local supermarket, drugstore, or pharmacy where ever you’re traveling and purchase that forgotten item.

Tip 2: Small Traveling Toiletry Bags with a clear counterpart

Having all your bathroom items in one spot makes traveling much easier. Find a small, flat, toiletry bag with multiple compartments that can fit your makeup, shower items, creams, brushes, and razors. But most importantly, search for a bag that has a clear compartment for your liquids, so that you can easily remove it from your carry-on when going through airport security.

Tip 3: Forget Travel-Sized Toothpaste

Stop buying travel-sized toothpaste, it is completely unnecessary. Standard-sized toothpaste tubes meet the liquids size requirements. Grab the toothpaste you use every day from your bathroom and bring it along with you, it is already small and lightweight so it won’t take up much space or weight you down, and it will save you a bit of money.

Tip 4: Travel-Sized Face Moisturizer

One of the hardest things to find is usually travel-sized face lotion. Finding a face lotion that fits the appropriate carry-on requirements is nearly impossible in the supermarkets and drug stores. After much searching, we found that Sanseti (https://www.sanseti.com/product/revitalizing-marine-moisturizer/) sells a fantastic face moisturizer that comes in 2-ounce jars, perfect for travel.  Don’t be afraid of the quantity, a little bit of this goes a long way.

Sanseti Skin Care: Revitalizing Marine Moisturizer
Sanseti Skin Care: Revitalizing Marine Moisturizer

Tip 5: When packing makeup: Less is more

Just take the essentials. Don’t take the whole makeup bag which surely has products in there that you never or rarely use. Select the products you use every day and put them into a small makeup bag for travel, ditching the items that you won’t need.

Bitnami